Schools and Social Project in Kenya I

Clinic
Nairobi
Schools I
Schools II
Mothers' Union
Ash Wed
Water
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The Kyasila primary school is adjacent to the Mua Hills Clinic. We had a tour of each classroom, the kitchen, office, and teachers' lounge, and then the younger kids sang Christian songs for us in the local "call and response" style. Christian education is compulsory in all schools. The school equipment is rudimentary - wooden bench-desks and a blackboard painted on one wall. There was no electricity in the school. There may be only one textbook for an entire classroom of 40 or more children. The syllabus is defined by the government, and teachers seem enormously dedicated - and respected. Children come to school in uniform, and from fourth grade on stay until late afternoon. School goes on year-round, with three terms and 3-4 weeks' break after each. Primary education (first eight years) is now free, by government edict since January, but parents must still buy uniforms. Education is not yet compulsory, though many expect primary education will become so shortly. School fees for secondary and university education are a significant barrier to many.


School next to Mua Hills Clinic

Head teacher at school

David and teachers

Typical class room

English & Swahili in each grade

Recess

Christian songs with Katharine

Song leader

Happily singing

David & Muthoka

Another leader

Mothers' Union project at Daystar University, a Christian ecumenical institution which prepares young people for a variety of careers. Josephine Kanuku, wife of Bishop Joseph Kanuku took us on the tour. Many students choose to board there, as it is an hour outside Nairobi. The Kanukus' two oldest children are students there, and commute daily from Machakos, which takes anywhere from 30 minutes to an hour each way. The Mothers' Union has built a dormitory building for young women who are too poor to afford the university's room and board fees. The building is nearly finished, and provides sleeping and study space as well as a kitchen for 24 young women. Money is lacking to furnish the building. All of the funds have been raised by women of the Diocese of Machakos. Their hope is that the fees the young women pay will begin to allow construction of a second dormitory building.


New dorm under construction

Katharine & Josephine

Workers wanting their picture

Chapel/school for faculty children

An enthusiastic class

Learning materials in classroom

Diocese of Mt. Kenya South, Mothers Mercy Home, an orphanage for 80 children. They are HIV negative children orphaned from AIDS. The operation is housed on a tiny half-acre plot, on which are separate girls' and boys' dormitories, a meeting hall and kitchen, a small garden plot, and an open-air clothes dryer. The Home presently serves children from age 4 to 7 or 8, and this new institution expects to expand to serve children up to age 18. They have a wonderful cadre of teachers and volunteers, and the deaneries of the diocese provide the food.

Mother's Union Project

Dormitory

Children